Authentic Mutton Momo – Childhood Memories

This is my story – I left my home to build my career and explore more when I was 23. Though I was grown up enough to adapt to anything, I still craved home food; because you know, unlike other states (slight exception for southern), spices are used but not extensively in my hometown. We do prefer light food, sometimes steamed and boiled as well. I won’t deny that our morning breakfasts, afternoon lunches and evening dinners are the normal roti – sabzi – chawal – parantha or a combination of any of the two, but the sharp taste is normally toned down to quite an extend.

Momo, being one of the most loved dishes in our place is like a staple food for us (sort of). It’s made with all purpose flour and is steamed, hence quite healthy. Now there is another set of controversy over eating all purpose flour – maida. People have somewhat accepted this myth about the non-beneficial character in it, but I won’t argue over this today because it’s about sharing recipes here. However, for people who are interested in knowing a little more on this, can click here and read the extracts from a website by Emily **.

Here is my recipe for an amazing plate of authentic momo.

Ingredients:

  • All purpose flour (maida) ……………..….. 1 & ½ cup (remember this is only a sample for about 10 – 15 momo)
  • Minced mutton meat     …………………….. ½ cup (a little fatty than normal)
  • Onion ………………………………….………….. ½ cup
  • Coriander leaves ……………………..………. ¼ cup
  • Spring onions …………………………….……. ¼ cup
  • Ginger ……………………………………….……. 1 tspn (squeezed juice)
  • Soy sauce …………………………………..……. 1 tspn (p.s. do no confuse with tablespoon)
  • Monosodium glutamate (ajinomoto) ….. ½ tspn
  • Salt …………………………………………………. To taste

 

For the soup:

  • Mutton with bone …………………………….. 3 – 4 pieces (you can try this with chicken as well)
  • Garlic ……………………………………………….. 4 – 5 cloves
  • Water ……………………………..……………….. As per your liking
  • Spring onions …………………..………………. ¼ cup
  • Ginger ……………………………..………………. 1 tspn (finely chopped)
  • Onion ……………………………………………….. ½ cup (sliced)
  • Salt ………………………………….………………. To taste

Method:

  • Knead dough with the given flour. The dough should be hard (not super hard, but almost like that of a pasta dough). Keep it aside
  • Mix everything from the list of ingredients well enough to form a sticky combination. This should take time because the chopped onion needs to be soft and translucent in the process
  • Take the dough and dice out small balls. This depends on the size of momo you are about to make. I usually have dough balls that can be rolled out into 2 & ½ inches diameter
  • Meanwhile, oil the steaming plate evenly to avoid the momo from sticking to each other and add the soup ingredients in the boiling dish and set it on a medium flame with the lid closed (you’ll have to remember to add more water to the soup before placing the steaming plate with momo in it)
  • Now, roll out the dough balls one by one and stuff them with the mutton mixture. If you aren’t sure about how to wrap a momo – click here for a video. Note that the dough should be rolled out thin on the outer edge and a little thick on the inside. Having said that, please know that the overall wrapper should be quite thin
  • Placed the wrapped momo simultaneously so that they don’t dry up while waiting
  • Once the plate it full, add some water (enough to make a good quantity soup but not too much – half the dish should be apt) to the boiling dish and bring it to boil. Then place the steaming plate over it. Turn the flame from medium to high and let it steam for 45 minutes

There is this really hot sauce we make for the momo. It’s made by boiling red dried chillies and grinding them with red tomatoes, few cloves of garlic and some salt. That’s it! The recipe to the authentic simple mutton momo is right here.

Please let me know how you liked it, in the comment section. Any question is welcome.

P.S. – The recipe to Veg momo will be following soon.

Bon Appétit

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